Contrast

In this episode, we’ll learn how to contrast two actions or facts. In other words, we’ll learn how to say “but” in Korean. When you want to say “but” in Korean, you should use -(으)나, -지만, -는데/-(으)ㄴ데, -아도/어도. 지금은 갈 수 없으나, 나중에는 꼭 가 봐야겠다. I cannot go now, but I will surely go

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Change of Action

  In this episode, we’ll talk about the change of action. For example, we’re going to learn how to say: He went out of his house before finishing his breakfast. He went to school and came back home. They are 2 separate actions and one is done after another and there is not much logical

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Spontaneity: while, as soon as

In this episode, we’ll learn how to talk about simultaneity. As always, it sounds hard if I try to explain the concept. In easy words, we’re going to learn what is “while” and “as soon as” in Korean. Strictly speaking, “as soon as” is not simultaneous. It happens right after something else. But let’s cover

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Listing sentences.

We’ll start our journey with listing. Or in easy words, we’ll learn how to express “and” in Korean. Before we do anything, I want you to know this. When you’re listing nouns or sentences, all you have to use is “and” in English. However, in Korean, it’s 와/과, 랑 for nouns and -(이)고 and -(이)며

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Combining Rules

We combine multiple sentences to communicate our meaning clearly. For example, we combine sentences like these: I told her. She was buying a cup of coffee. into: I told her who was buying a cup of coffee. We combined 2 short sentences into a long sentence by using a relative pronoun. We’ll learn how to

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Multiple Markers 2

We’ll continue learning how to use multiple markers together. Auxiliary Marker II + Auxiliary Marker I If you want to use 2 types of auxiliary markers together, you should use auxiliary marker II(만, 까지, 다가, 밖에, 부터, 조차) before auxiliary marker I(은/는, 야, 도, (이)나, (이)라도). 15일까지는 완성할 수 있을 것 같아. I guess I

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Multiple Markers 1

We learned almost all of the markers in Korean. What we’re going to do next is learning how to use multiple markers together. If you see those markers used together, you think they randomly work together. But there are orders. 여기는까지 내가 할게. (x) 여기까지는 내가 할게. (o) I’ll finish it until here. 이렇게 추운

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Auxiliary markers for inclusion/exclusion – Korean Markers #11

  Today, we’ll learn markers that are used for inclusion and exclusion. Limit/Include only. When you want to include something or someone only, you should use “만, 밖에, 뿐”. 나는 점심에 삼각 김밥만 먹었다. 나는 점심에 삼각 김밥밖에 먹은 것이 없다. 내가 점심에 먹은 것은 삼각 김밥뿐이다. I only ate triangular 김밥 this lunch. 어제

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Auxiliary markers for contrast, topic, selection – Korean Markers #10

Until last week, we learned 격조사. They are used to specify the grammatical roles of the words in senteces. From today, we’ll learn 보조사, auxiliary markers. These markers are used to add meaning like contrast, topic, exclusion, inclusion, choice. 은/는 I’ve covered the difference between 은/는 vs. 이/가 long ago. In the article, I’ve told

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Adverb Markers: People and Tools

In this episode, we’ll learn what adverb markers we should use when we want to talk about people and tools. Approaching/Leaving We learned that we should use 에 when you’re approaching to a place, 에서 when you’re moving away from that place. If you’re approaching people/animal, you should use 에게/한테. If you’re getting away from

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